The Power of Prayer Part 4

4 replies
  1. Derek Bowls
    Derek Bowls says:

    I have noticed on your previous podcasts that most Bible verses used to illustrate the Lord’s teaching come from the “1984 NIV”. Personally, I do prefer this version over the more gender-neutral 2011 version. But I would love to get your take as to why this version is used in your podcasts.

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    • Glenn Meldrum
      Glenn Meldrum says:

      Well, I would like to quote the Scriptures from the Greek and Hebrew but nobody would understand what I’m saying and then I’d have to learn those languages myself. The 1984 is a good translation that balances accuracy with the feel of what is being said. I don’t like the 2011 NIV because of its political correctness. Every translation has its weaknesses. One big reason why I use that translation is because of its popularity and can use it when I preach all over the country. When I preach at churches that predominately use the KJV I use that. Obviously, I am not KJV only and never will be because the arguments behind those claims are not Bionically sound or logical and I have heard them all. I don’t mind you asking the question, but did you hear the teaching?

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      • Derek Bowls
        Derek Bowls says:

        I certainly did. We do not devote ourselves to prayer (myself included), even though the Lord (through the Apostle Paul) gives us the charge to pray without ceasing. I loved the bit about William Seymour’s devotion to prayer, prior to the Azusa Street Revival. I also remembered a sermon you gave years ago (“Making a Man of God”), where devotion to prayer was paramount, prior to the Hebrides Awakening. These days, the devotion to prayer in America, as a whole, is dismal (although there are a few strongholds). Because of this, it’s doubtful there will be another significant revival in America anytime soon. Pastor Jim Cymbala probably said it best that “you can attract thousands of people to a Christian concert, but you can’t draw even 20 people to an important prayer meeting”. But I have to ask, was the Azusa Street Revival the last significant revival we’ve had in America?

        Reply
        • Glenn Meldrum
          Glenn Meldrum says:

          Derek, you made some excellent points. The Azusa Street Revival had worldwide implications far beyond a national awakening. The belief in an end times revival that is so popular today has its roots in post-millennialism. The basic idea is that the church will usher in the second coming of Christ through the world getting better from this final revival. The problem is that the Scriptures state the exact opposite. Yet there will be a move of God, but not as we have seen in America to date. The end times are about redemption–saving all those want God’s salvation before He brings an end to the world as we know it. It will probably be underground like it is in many countries around the world today. Jesus is coming back for a bride without spot and He will do His sanctifying work in those who “love His appearing.” Ezra 9:8 is the cry of my heart in these last days, ” . . . that our God may enlighten our eyes and give us a measure of revival in our bondage” (NKJV). Keep pressing in. Jesus is worth the pursuit.

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